Description

Peppermint oil is extracted from Mentha piperita of the Labiatae family. The therapeutic properties of spearmint oil are antiseptic, antispasmodic, carminative, cephalic, emmenagogue, insecticide, restorative and stimulant. This cooling and refreshing essential oil is used in aromatherapy to stimulate the mind, increase mental agility and to increase focus, while cooling the skin, reducing redness and calming irritation and itchiness. It furthermore helps to ease spastic colon, migraine, headaches, sinus and chest congestion and boosts the digestive system.

Peppermint oil has a fresh, sharp, menthol smell, is clear to pale yellow in color and watery in viscosity.

  • 100% Pure
  • Mentha Piperita
  • Purity Tested/Quality Assured

 

Aroma: A fresh, cool, sweet grassy-minty scent
Country of Ogigin: India
Benefits: Stimulant and is a great choice for inclusion in mixtures that improve alertness and stamina. It is considered an aphrodisiac.
Theurapeutic properties: The therapeutic properties of peppermint oil are analgesic, anesthetic, antiseptic, antigalactagogue, antiphlogistic, antispasmodic, astringent, carminative, cephalic, cholagogue, cordial, decongestant, emmenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, hepatic, nervine, stimulant, stomachic, sudorific, vasoconstrictor and vermifuge.
Mixes (Blends) well with: Basil Linalool, Coriander Seed, Eucalyptus Globulus, Eucalyptus Radiata, Geranium Egyptian, Lavender, Lemon, Palmarosa, Black Pepper, Rosemary
1,8-Cineole, Spearmint, Vanilla C02, Wintergreen, Ylang Ylang Complete.
Extraction method: Steam Distilled
Color: Clear to pale yellow
Consistency: Thin
Perfumery Note: Top
Strenghtofinitialaroma: Strong
Plant – part used: Leaves

Suggested Use

Peppermint can be diluted in carrier oil and applied to the temples and back of the neck when having head and neck tension. Add, well-diluted, to a carrier oil for an uplifting massage. It is also helpful to sniff when having a queasy stomach. Also useful at the end of a long day as a foot-soak, add a few drops to ½ cup of salt dissolved in warm water.

Extraction peppermint oil

Peppermint oil is extracted from the whole plant above ground just before flowering.  The oil is extracted by steam distillation from the fresh or partly dried plant and the yield is 0.1 – 1.0 %.

Therapeutic properties

The therapeutic properties of peppermint oil are analgesic, anesthetic, antiseptic, antigalactagogue, antiphlogistic, antispasmodic, astringent, carminative, cephalic, cholagogue, cordial, decongestant, emmenagogue, expectorant, febrifuge, hepatic, nervine,
stimulant, stomachic, sudorific, vasoconstrictor and vermifuge.

Uses

Peppermint oil is excellent for mental fatigue and depression, refreshing the spirit and stimulating mental agility and improving concentration. It helps for apathy, shock, headache, migraine, nervous stress, vertigo and faintness and in general respiratory
disorders, as well as dry coughs, sinus congestion, asthma, bronchitis, pneumonia, tuberculosis and cholera.

For the digestive system, peppermint oil is effective for a range of ailments, as it stimulates the gall bladder and the secretion of bile. It is used for colic, cramps, dyspepsia, spastic colon, flatulence and nausea and can relieve pain in cases of
toothache, aching feet, rheumatism, neuralgia, muscular pains and painful periods.

On the skin, peppermint oil is used to relieve skin irritation and itchiness and also helps to reduce skin redness, where inflammation is present. It is used for dermatitis, acne, ringworm, scabies and pruritus and also relieves itching, sunburn and inflammation
of the skin, while at the same time having a cooling action.

Burners and vaporizers

In vapor therapy, peppermint oil can help to increase concentration and to stimulate the mind, as well as sorting out coughs, headaches, nausea and also has value as an insect repellant.

Blended oil or in the bath

As a blended massage oil or diluted in the bath, peppermint oil can assist with colic, cramps, back pain, inflamed bowel disorders, spastic colon, catarrh, colitis, circulation, constipation, coughs, diarrhea, sweaty and tired feet, flatulence, headaches,
muscular pains, cramps and spasms, neuralgia, nausea, rheumatism and mental fatigue, skin that is red, irritated and itchy, as well as other inflammatory conditions.

Mouthwash

A mouthwash with peppermint oil included can help with bad breath and gum infections.

Cream or lotion

When included in a cream or lotion, it will help to ease the sting of sunburn, reduce redness of inflamed skin, reduce itchiness and cools down the skin with its vasoconstrictor properties.

Chemistry of Peppermint oil

The chemical components of peppermint oil are menthol, menthone, 1,8-cineole, methyl acetate, methofuran, isomenthone, limonene, b-pinene, a-pinene, germacrene-d, trans-sabinene hydrate and pulegone.

Other Ingredients

100% pure Peppermint oil.

Warnings

Natural essence oils are highly concentrated and should be used with care.
Peppermint oil is non-toxic and non-irritant in low dilutions, but sensitization may be a problem due to the menthol content.
It can cause irritation to the skin and mucus membranes and should be kept well away from the eyes.
Caution: Keep out of reach of children. Avoid contact with eyes. If pregnant or lactating, consult your healthcare practitioner before using.

Precautions:

  • FOR EXTERNAL USE ONLY
  • Do not apply undiluted to skin
  • Avoid use during pregnancy, and keep away from children
  • Store in a cool dry place

Storage

This mixture has already been diluted and ready for use. Look at the book of essential oils.
Essential oils mixed with bearing oils can clog the diffusers; Please thoroughly clean it after each use.

Disclaimer

While “Health from Nature” strives to ensure the accuracy of its product images and information. Although items may occasionally ship with alternate packaging, freshness is always guaranteed. We recommend that you read the labels, warnings and instructions for all products before using them. Read all instructions from “Health of Nature”. Use specialized manuals such as The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals 2nd Edition(Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young: Churchill Livingstone, 2013) or other professional reference source for suggested uses.

Additional information

Plant

Usage

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